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Wikenigma - an Encyclopaedia of Unknowns Wikenigma - an Encyclopaedia of the Unknown Science

Cosmic Microwave Background excess

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is currently our most precise window on the physics of the early universe. Measurements of the frequency spectrum of the CMB can rule out alternative cosmologies and place limits on physical processes that may distort the spectrum, including dark matter particle decay and reionization.

Source: The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 734, Number 1

Measurements of the CMB noise as performed by NASA's ARCADE 2 balloon-based microwave measurement probe (2009) found that, in the 3 GHz waveband, the background noise was some six times more prominent than had been predicted. Strong enough to obscure noise-data from extremely distant galaxies.

The source(s) of the (excess) background noise is currently unexplained.

The sought-for signal from the earliest stars remains hidden behind the newly detected cosmic radio background. This noise complicates efforts to detect the very first stars, which are thought to have formed about 13 billion years ago – not long, in cosmic terms, after the Big Bang. Nevertheless, this cosmic static may provide important clues to the development of galaxies when the universe was less than half its present age. Unlocking its origins should provide new insight into the development of radio sources in the early universe.

Source : NASA

Also see : Big Bang theoryplugin-autotooltip__plain plugin-autotooltip_bigBig Bang theory

There is now a large body of evidence to support the Big Bang Theory for the origin of the universe, but the problem remains as to the origin of the material or energy which initialised it. As the UK’s Astronomer Royal Martin Rees has put it :

"“We d…

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