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Indexed under : Life Sciences / Human Body

Wikenigma - an Encyclopedia of Unknowns Wikenigma - an Encyclopedia of the Unknown

Brodmann area 10

Brodmann area 10 (a.k.a. BA10, frontopolar prefrontal cortex, rostrolateral prefrontal cortex, or anterior prefrontal cortex) is a frontal lobe area in the human brain which has been found to be generally associated with working memoryplugin-autotooltip__plain plugin-autotooltip_bigMemory

"Although it is commonly accepted that learning and memory occur via enduring changes in neuronal properties such as synaptic strength within a network of neurons, many details of these processes remain unknown, including the mechanisms responsible for the pers…
and multiple-task coordination. The area has also been implicated in 'decision making'.

But there's a lack of agreement (and lack of specification) among neuroscientists on specific functions.

One of the least well understood regions of the human brain is rostral prefrontal cortex, approximating Brodmann's area 10. Here, we investigate the possibility that there are functional subdivisions within this region by conducting a meta-analysis of 104 functional neuroimaging studies (using positron emission tomography/functional magnetic resonance imaging). Studies involving working memory and episodic memory retrieval were disproportionately associated with lateral activations, whereas studies involving mentalizing (i.e., attending to one's own emotions and mental states or those of other agents) were disproportionately associated with medial activations.“

Source : Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

Also see Fusiform Gyrusplugin-autotooltip__plain plugin-autotooltip_bigFusiform Gyrus

First named in 1854, the Fusiform Gyrus is a brain-area found in hominoids (inc. humans), the function of which is still mostly unknown.

"The fusiform gyrus, also known as the lateral occipitotemporal gyrus, is part of the temporal lobe and occipital l…


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